Jones Apparel

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• The Jones Apparel family of clothing includes the popular brands Anne Klein, Nine West, Bandolino, and Jones Wear. While the company's wide array of clothes and footwear are found in virtually every shopping center in the U.S, its labor and ethical practices should be of concern to consumers.

• Jones Apparel derives most of its garments from developing countries and although the company has a corporate code of conduct for its suppliers, abuses are still common.

• Jones Apparel has been accused of sourcing from sweatshops in Jordan.

• The company was part of a settlement from a lawsuit brought against 22 companies for allegedly using sweatshop labor in Saipan, a US territory in the South Pacific.

• Jones Apparel scored a zero on a June 2007 report by Climate Counts examining companies’ commitments to becoming more environmentally friendly.

• You don’t have to wear clothing that exploits people and the planet. Visit Go Green to find out how you can be stylish and sustainable.

-- Profile Updated 07/01/2010

About Jones Apparel


Based in Bristol, Pennsylvania, Jones Apparel manufactures and designs men’s, women’s and children’s clothing and shoes. The company owns and operates over 1,100 retail and outlet stores. Jones Apparel currently employs about 16,485 people and reported 2006 sales of $4.74billion.

Affiliates

- Apparel Testing Services, Inc. - Jersey City, NJ
- Asia Expert Limited - Kwai Chung, China (Hong Kong)
- Barney's Inc. - New York, NY

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- Barney's Inc. - New York, NY
- Barneys (CA) Lease Corp. - New York, NY
- Barneys (NY) Lease Corp. - New York, NY
- Barneys America (Chicago) Lease Corp. - New York, NY
- Barneys America, Inc. - New York, NY
- Barneys Asia Co LLC - New York, NY
- Barneys New York, Inc. (Subsidiary) - New York, NY
- Basco All-American Sportswear Corp. - New York, NY
- BNY Licensing Corp. - New York, NY
- Compania de Calzados de Exportacion SA - Alicante, Spain
- Gloria Vanderbilt Apparel Corporation - Edison, NJ
- Jones Apparel Group Canada Inc. - Vaughan, Canada
- Jones Investment Co., Inc. - Wilmington, DE
- Jones Retail Corporation - Bristol, PA
- Kasper, Ltd. (Subsidiary) - Secaucus, NJ
- Maquilas Pami, S.A.d de C.V. - Durango, Mexico
- McNaughton Apparel Group Inc. - New York, NY
- Melru Corporation - Bristol, PA
- Nine West (UK) Holdings Limited - London, United Kingdom
- Nine West Accessories (HK) Limited - Kowloon, China (Hong Kong)
- Nine West Group (Division) - White Plains, NY
- NineWest UK - Glasgow, United Kingdom
- Norton McNaughton of Squire, Inc. - New York, NY
- Shops for Pappagallo Inc. - Cincinnati, OH
- The Shoe Studio Group Limited - London, United Kingdom
- Victoria + Co. Ltd. - Rumford, RI

Contact Jones Apparel


Jones Apparel
Keystone Park
Bristol, PA 19007 USA

Phone: 215-785-4000

Web: www.jny.com

Alerts

Labor

The National Labor Committee’s May 2006 report entitled “US-Jordan Free Trade Agreement Descends into Human Trafficking & Involunt…

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The National Labor Committee’s May 2006 report entitled “US-Jordan Free Trade Agreement Descends into Human Trafficking & Involuntary Servitude,” documented workers’ rights violations in Jordanian factories. Cited factories included the Al Safa, Hi-Tech, Ivory Garment, Caliber Garment, Sari Factory, Prestige Apparel, Fresh Taste Apparel, M.K. Garments, Petra Apparel, and Al Cap Factory, all of which sow for the Gloria Vanderbilt label. The lack of respect for workers’ basic human rights included the following:

  • Human trafficking and involuntary servitude of guest workers
  • Confiscation of workers’ passports and denial of legally required identification cards
  • Routine work shifts of 14.5 to 19 hours. In the Caliber Factory, 10 percent of the workers were obligated to participate in all night shifts
  • No sick days, paid vacations, or government holidays allowed
  • Wages below the legal minimum. At Hi-Tech, workers were cheated of 45 to 80 percent of their wages. Workers at M.K. Garments earned 17 cents for each pair of Gloria Vanderbilt jeans sewn
  • Sporadic pay
  • Inadequate and unsanitary working conditions
  • Workers subject to humiliation, violence and threats if production goals not met

A worker at the Ivory Factory said: “We feel like we are dead… worn out, broken and exhausted. Just work, work, work, but no wage, no dollars. Just work, eat poorly and then sleep a few hours. People are getting sick and their health is deteriorating.” Those who spoke out about such conditions were forcibly deported. An Ivory Garment factory worker stated: “No one can speak. Many have been sent back already.”

While the NLC was investigating working conditions at the Al Safa garment factory, it was discovered that a young Bangladeshi worker committed suicide after allegedly being raped by the factory manager. There has been no official investigation of her rape and death.

A September 2006 update on the state of Jordanian factories reported significant improvements at Sari International. Management returned the confiscated passports and provided workers with residency documents. Workers spend no more than 10.5 hours a day at the factory, are paid the legal minimum, and enjoy 3 or 4 days off each month. However, no improvements were noted at the Caliber Garment factory. Only minor advances were made at Prestige, including the institution of 8 hour work days and legal minimum monthly wages for workers.

-- National Labor Committee, 09/27/2006

Source URL: www.nlcnet.org/article.php?id=10


Jones Apparel was one of 18 retailers that agreed to settle a federal class-action lawsuit brought by garment workers in the North…

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Jones Apparel was one of 18 retailers that agreed to settle a federal class-action lawsuit brought by garment workers in the Northern Mariana Islands. The company agreed to compensate workers who claimed they had been underpaid and overworked in sweatshop conditions, and to fund an independent monitoring system to guard against labor abuses on the island of Saipan. The settlement (including all 18 retailers) has totaled $8 million, with no admission of wrongdoing from the companies.

-- Reuters, 03/28/2000

Source URL: www.cleanclothes.org/legal/00-03-30.htm


Ethics and Governance

In October 2004, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit against Nine West Footwear Corp.…

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In October 2004, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit against Nine West Footwear Corp. and its parent company, Jones Apparel, alleging that female employees were subjected to sexual harassment and national origin harassment. The suit said a female employee filed charges with the commission on behalf of herself and other women who faced similar situations. The lawsuit alleges that harassment included solicitations for sex, sexually explicit jokes and comments, unwelcome sexual advances and gestures, and physical groping of female employees by a male manager. It alleges that a senior manager asked one employee if she was ready to have an affair. It also alleges that a senior manager referred to Hispanic employees using offensive terms and made repeated comments regarding the ability of female Hispanics to perform sex acts. Jones Apparel said in a written statement yesterday that it was "surprised and disappointed" by the EEOC's lawsuit, saying it had already taken related action in connection with the allegations before a complaint was filed with the EEOC and that it has been cooperating with the commission's investigation.

Jones Apparel said it had been working with the EEOC "on appropriate remedial actions" and was surprised by the lawsuit. "For reasons not explained to us, the EEOC has instead decided to resort to litigation. We strongly deny the allegations that we violated Title VII," the statement said. Jones Apparel says it intends to contest the suit.

Jones Apparel settled the case for $600,000 in May 2006.

-- Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), 05/22/2006

Source URL: www.eeoc.gov/press/5-22-06b.html


In April 2002, Jones Apparel agreed to settle a lawsuit alleging that the company violated a federal law by attaching a "Dry Clean…

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In April 2002, Jones Apparel agreed to settle a lawsuit alleging that the company violated a federal law by attaching a "Dry Clean Only" label on cashmere sweaters that can be washed by hand, among other care-labeling inaccuracies. The instructions appeared on clothing sold under the brands Jones NY and Jones NY Sport. Jones agreed to pay a $300,000 fine without admitting any liability and agreed to comply with the FTC's care-labeling rules.

-- Federal Trade Commission, 04/02/2002

Source URL: www.ftc.gov/opa/2002/04/jones.shtm


Environment

A June 2007 report by Climate Counts ranked companies in the Apparel/Accessories market by their committment and effort to introdu…

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A June 2007 report by Climate Counts ranked companies in the Apparel/Accessories market by their committment and effort to introduce energy efficient and renewable energy initiatives. Jones Apparel scored the lowest among the companies with a score of zero.

-- Climate Counts, 06/20/2007

Source URL: www.climatecounts.org/pdf/CCScorecardReport-App6-07.pdf