Agribusiness Industry

 

Jump to: About the Agribusiness Industry; Agribusiness Campaigns;

 

Companies at the top are the best, at the bottom the worst.

company
overall
ranking
environ-
ment
human
rights
labor
ethics &
governance
health &
safety
1

D

n/i

C

F

C

2 (tie)

D

D

C

F

F

2 (tie)

D

D

C

F

F

Notes: Rankings proceed from top to bottom with companies at the top as more responsible within the industry and those at the bottom as the less responsible. Letter grades go in this order: A (best),B,C,D,F(worst) with plus (+) and minus (-). "n/i" means we don't have enough information to give a letter grade for that category. The color coding is another corporate responsibility indicator, in the order Green (best), Yellow, Orange, Red (worst). Companies in the green zone are sustainable and working towards creating a greener planet (most industries will not have companioes in the green zone as there are no companies that can be considered sustainable in that industry). Companies red zone have poor environmental and social responsibility records and should be avoided if possible. 'Orange' companies are not quite as bad as 'red' and ' yellow' zone are slightly better than orange. Orange and yellow companies have a ways to go before they can be considered green.

Fast facts about the agribusiness industry

  • The agribusiness industry manufactures and processes grains, cotton, soybeans, and peanut oil, and is also a leading trader of cocoa.
  • Companies throughout this industry have been accused of numerous human rights violations including the use of child slave labor and trafficking, exposing employees to hazardous working conditions, toxic pesticides, and other harmful chemicals.
  • The production of genetically modified crops pollutes traditional varieties both in the United States and abroad.
  • Agribusinesses have been accused of illegal deforestation and destruction as well as dumping toxic waste materials.
  • Agribusinesses, who are among the top political donors, receive special treatment from the federal government in the form of ethanol tax credits, tariffs imposed against foreign ethanol competitors, and federally mandated ethanol additive standards. In addition, governmental subsidies paid out to the agribusiness industry do not apply to smaller farmers and cost the American taxpayers billion of dollars.
  • Rapid development of corn ethanol, which agribusiness companies lobby extensively on, has lead to a rapid spike in grain and food processinc, resulting in food shortages in the developing world.
  • Visit Go Green for tips on how to find eco-friendly food and products that do not exploit people or the planet.