Athleticwear Industry

 

Jump to: About the Athleticawear Industry; Athleticwear Industry Campaigns

 

Companies at the top are the best, at the bottom the worst.

company
overall
ranking
environ-
ment
human
rights
labor
ethics &
governance
health &
safety
1

n/i

n/i

D

n/i

n/i

2

n/i

n/i

D

n/i

n/i

3

n/i

n/i

D

D

n/i

4

n/i

n/i

D

n/i

C

5

n/i

D

F

n/i

C

Notes: Rankings proceed from top to bottom with companies at the top as more responsible within the industry and those at the bottom as the less responsible. Letter grades go in this order: A (best),B,C,D,F(worst) with plus (+) and minus (-). "n/i" means we don't have enough information to give a letter grade for that category. The color coding is another corporate responsibility indicator, in the order Green (best), Yellow, Orange, Red (worst). Companies in the green zone are sustainable and working towards creating a greener planet (most industries will not have companioes in the green zone as there are no companies that can be considered sustainable in that industry). Companies red zone have poor environmental and social responsibility records and should be avoided if possible. 'Orange' companies are not quite as bad as 'red' and ' yellow' zone are slightly better than orange. Orange and yellow companies have a ways to go before they can be considered green.

Fast facts about the athleticwear industry

  • With one exception in Canada, none of Nike’s North American stores, which employ over 23,000 people, is unionized.
  • Nike’s garment supplier factories overseas have repeatedly squashed union activity, harassed and intimidated active union leaders, and threatened violence against union organizers.
  • These factories enforce compulsory and unpaid overtime, insufficient wages, illegal discrimination, lack of benefit rights for workers, and obligatory pregnancy tests. Reports of physical, sexual, and verbal abuse are widespread and workers frequently report non-payment of back-wages owed to them.
  • Workers are paid, on average, less than three tenths of one percent of the retail price for every jersey they sew.
  • Many products produced in these factories have been found to contain toxic chemicals, such as TBT, which have been linked to birth defects, sterility and respiratory problems.
  • The athletic wear industry has a history of successful lobbying, and has used its political clout to oppose trade policies that enforce workers’ rights.
  • Visit Go Green to learn how you can be sporty and sustainable.