coffee beans

Coffee Industry

 

Jump to: About the Coffee Industry; Coffee Industry Campaigns

 

Companies at the top are the best, at the bottom the worst.

company
overall
ranking
environ-
ment
human
rights
labor
ethics &
governance
health &
safety
1

n/i

C-

C-

C-

C

2

C-

C-

F

C

D

3

C-

n/i

D

D

N/I

4

n/i

n/i

F

F

D

5

F

F

F

F

F

Notes: Rankings proceed from top to bottom with companies at the top as more responsible within the industry and those at the bottom as the less responsible. Letter grades go in this order: A (best),B,C,D,F(worst) with plus (+) and minus (-). "n/i" means we don't have enough information to give a letter grade for that category. The color coding is another corporate responsibility indicator, in the order Green (best), Yellow, Orange, Red (worst). Companies in the green zone are sustainable and working towards creating a greener planet (most industries will not have companioes in the green zone as there are no companies that can be considered sustainable in that industry). Companies red zone have poor environmental and social responsibility records and should be avoided if possible. 'Orange' companies are not quite as bad as 'red' and ' yellow' zone are slightly better than orange. Orange and yellow companies have a ways to go before they can be considered green.

Fast facts about the coffee industry

  • Falling coffee bean prices have pushed thousands of farmers to the brink of poverty, yet the coffee industry has failed to seriously address this issue.
  • The four largest coffee roasters in the United States, Kraft Foods, Nestlé, Proctor & Gamble and Sara Lee, have all been criticized for refusing to ensure that a decent price is paid to farmers for coffee beans and for failing to deliver on promises to sell more fairly traded coffee.
  • Starbucks, the fifth largest coffee roaster, still refuses to provide human rights monitors with information about where and how the company has made improvements despite claims that the company would improve the wages and working conditions of impoverished workers on coffee plantations in Guatemala and elsewhere.
  • You can get your caffeine fix without exploiting people or the planet. Visit Go Green to learn how.