Puma

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• Puma has been repeatedly implicated in egregious violations of workers' rights in Turkey, China, El Salvador, and Indonesia.

• Puma has been criticized for contracting with factories that force their workers to work excessively long hours for little pay.

• Workers in a Salvadoran factory who manufactured an item that sold for $145 were paid only 23 cents.

• Some of Puma's products have been found to contain toxic chemicals.

• You can be sporty and sustainable. Visit Go Green to learn how.

-- Profile Updated 07/01/2010

About Puma


Puma manufactures and distributes men’s and women's athletic shoes and apparel for sports ranging from soccer and tennis to auto racing. Puma products are sold in more than 80 countries. Through an alliance with LogoAthletic, Puma supplies NFL and NBA players with shoes and apparel. According to the company's annual report, in FY 2006, Puma reported revenues of 2.8 million Euros and employed 6,831 people worldwide.

Campaigns

Send Bangladeshi Child Workers Back to School

Bangladeshi garment plant Harvest Rich employed roughly 200 to 300 children to sew clothes for Puma…

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Bangladeshi garment plant Harvest Rich employed roughly 200 to 300 children to sew clothes for Puma, JCPenney, Wal-Mart and Hanes. In October 2006, the National Labor Committee reported children being beaten, suffering from exhaustion, working mandatory 12 to 14 hour days, and being paid as little as 6½ cents an hour. Harvest Rich fired more than 100 child workers following the publication of NLC's report and threatened to fire any workers found cooperating with the investigation of labor conditions. NLC is demanding US companies sourcing from the factory to supply each fired child worker with a monthly stipend to ease strain on their families and cover essential school expenses for textbooks, supplies, uniforms and shoes so the children may return to school. Read NLC's report to learn more details of the factory. Click on the URL below to take action in support of Bangladeshi Child workers.

www.nlcnet.org/article.php?id=189


Support Turkish Garment Workers

Paxar, a US-based company that produces garments for Adidas…

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Paxar, a US-based company that produces garments for Adidas, Disney, Gap, Levi's, Nike, Puma, Wal-Mart and other brands, has blatantly violated Turkish law and corporate codes of conduct by squashing trade union organizing at the company, firing worker activists, pressuring union members to renounce their membership, discriminating against union members and failing to negotiate with an authorized trade union. The Clean Clothes Campaign is calling on consumers globally to pressure these major brand name companies to protect the workers making their garments. Click on the URL below to act now.

www.cleanclothes.org/urgent/06-08-24.htm#action


Clean Clothes Campaign

The Clean Clothes Campaign is an international campaign that aims to improve working conditions and to empower workers in the global garment industry…

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The Clean Clothes Campaign is an international campaign that aims to improve working conditions and to empower workers in the global garment industry, in order to end the oppression, exploitation and abuse of workers in this industry, most of whom are women.

www.cleanclothes.org


Affiliates

- Austria Puma Dassler GmbH - Salzburg, Austria
- Liberty Ltd. - Kowloon, China (Hong Kong)
- Puma Australia Pty. - Moorabbin, Australia

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- Puma Australia Pty. - Moorabbin, Australia
- Puma Chile S.A. - Santiago, Chile
- Puma Denmark AS - Skanderborg, Denmark
- Puma France S.A. - Illkirch-Graffenstaden, France
- PUMA Holland B.V. - Leusden, Netherlands
- PUMA HUNGARY KFT. - Budapest, Hungary
- Puma Italia S.r.l. - Milan, Italy
- Puma New Zealand Limited - Auckland, New Zealand
- Puma North America, Inc. - Westford, MA
- Puma Polska Sp. z o.o. - Warsaw, Poland
- PUMA RUS LTD. - Moscow, Russia
- Puma Schweiz AG - Lengnau, Switzerland
- Puma United Kingdom Ltd. - Leatherhead, United Kingdom
- Tretorn Sport Sales Ltd. - Portlaoise, Ireland
- Tretorn Sweden AB - Helsingborg, Sweden
- World Cat Ltd. - Kowloon, China (Hong Kong)

Contact Puma


Puma
5 Lyberty Way
Westford, MA 01886 USA

Phone: 978-698-1000

Web: www.puma.com

Alerts

Labor

The Clean Clothes Campaign highlighted a series of worker rights violations in global garment supplier Paxar Corporation’s Turkish…

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The Clean Clothes Campaign highlighted a series of worker rights violations in global garment supplier Paxar Corporation’s Turkish factory. The Turkish factory and Paxar Corporation have repeatedly tried to block trade union activity:

In early 2005, Paxar fired 11 workers shortly after the union successfully organized the factory and opened negotiations with Paxar. According to the Turkish High Court of Appeal’s decisions, these firings were illegal, and Paxar was ordered to reinstate all 11 workers. The company has yet to implement the High Court’s ruling.

In late 2005, the Turkish factory dismissed at least 4 trade union members. Ayce Bagbakar, who joined the trade union in March 2006, was fired in April 2006. The Clean Clothes Campaign states that these cases, which are still underway, “represent clear-cut unfair dismissals.”

In August 2006, Textile, Knitting and Clothing Industry Workers' Union of Turkey (TEKSIF) unsuccessfully negotiated with Paxar on issues such as wage and bonus payments. The Clean Clothes Campaign asks consumers to pressure brands that buy from the Turkish factory to express their disapproval over these labor violations. Turkish factory’s clients include Gap, Levi Strauss, Wal-Mart, Disney, Adidas, Puma, and Nike. (See related item in Current Campaigns)

-- Clean Clothes Campaign, 06/20/2006

Source URL: www.cleanclothes.org/urgent/06-08-24.htm


According to the Clean Clothes Campaigns report, "Conditions of Women Workers in Special Economic Zones and Labour Standards in Su…

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According to the Clean Clothes Campaigns report, "Conditions of Women Workers in Special Economic Zones and Labour Standards in Supplier Factories of German Garment Retailer Companies and Brands in China," Puma and Adidas continue to source garments from China-based factories with documented labor violations. Two supplier factories require eight regular hours of work per day, plus an additional four to five hours of overtime at least six days a week during peak production seasons. During peak times workers have one day or less of rest per month. Factory managers regularly falsify time cards to cover up labor abuses.

-- Hong Kong Christian Industrial Committee, 09/16/2004

Source URL: www.cleanclothes.org/ftp/04-09-16-HKCIC-EPZ-Research.pdf


Play Fair at the Olympics, a joint venture between the Clean Clothes Campaign and Oxfam which examines the abuses behind creating …

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Play Fair at the Olympics, a joint venture between the Clean Clothes Campaign and Oxfam which examines the abuses behind creating clothing and equipment for the 2004 Olympics, reports that workers at an Indonesian factory producing for Fila, Asics, Puma, Nike and Adidas are routinely subjected to sexual harassment. “Pretty girls in the factory are always harassed by the male managers. The come onto the girls, call them into their offices, whisper in their ears, touch them at the waist, arms, neck, buttocks and breasts, bribe the girls with money and threats of losing their jobs to have sex with them” said a worker interviewed by the report.

-- Clean Clothes Campaign, 03/01/2004

Source URL: www.fairolympics.org/background/olympicreporteng.pdf


On January 13, 2003, worker's in Puma's U.S. subcontracted shoe factory staged a one-day strike to protest forced overtime, withh…

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On January 13, 2003, worker's in Puma's U.S. subcontracted shoe factory staged a one-day strike to protest forced overtime, withholding of wages, verbal abuse by superiors, denial of union formation, locks on the door to prevent worker's from leaving, and illegally low wages. Worker's claim they are forced to lie during customer audits of the factory and make lower than local region minimum wages.

-- CleanUp GE, 01/22/2003

Source URL: www.cleanclothes.org/urgent/03-01-22.htm


Puma has been criticized for using sweatshop labor.…

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Puma has been criticized for using sweatshop labor. According to Charles Kernaghan, of the National Labor Committee, workers in a Salvadoran factory who manufactured an item that sold for $145 were paid only 23 cents. Such merchandise includes garments carrying the New York Knicks logo. In these factories, female workers are forced to take periodic pregnancy tests and are fired for testing positive. A typical work week is 66 hours -- eleven-hour shifts, six days per week.

-- Daily News (New York), 05/11/2001

Source URL: none available


Puma was one of fifteen U.S. companies with factories in China that was criticized for inhumane treatment of workers, "including l…

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Puma was one of fifteen U.S. companies with factories in China that was criticized for inhumane treatment of workers, "including long shifts, brutal working conditions, and wages that amount to pennies a day". Many of the employees in these factories are teenage girls working 14 hour shifts, seven days per week. Other complaints include: working with toxic substances without gloves, verbal and physical abuse, and working temperatures that reached more than 100 degrees. Puma said it planned to investigate, stating their code of conduct is very stringent.

-- The Record (Bergen County, NJ), 05/19/2000

Source URL: none available


Health and Safety

Inks used to print on football shirts made by Puma contain toxic chemicals such as tributyltin (TBT) and other toxins.…

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Inks used to print on football shirts made by Puma contain toxic chemicals such as tributyltin (TBT) and other toxins. These chemicals have been linked to birth defects, sterility, respiratory problems, pancreatitis and atrophy of thymus. Puma claims to aim for products free of health and environmentally damaging materials and says it uses independent monitors to ensure its products are meeting safety standards.

-- Greenpeace, 11/16/2004

Source URL: www.greenpeaceweb.org/lichaamzondergif/dossiers/puma.pdf