electrical towers

Utilities Industry

 

Jump to: About the Utilities Industry; Utilities Industry Campaigns

 

Companies at the top are the best, at the bottom the worst.

company
overall
ranking
environ-
ment
human
rights
labor
ethics &
governance
health &
safety
1

F

n/i

n/i

C-

n/i

2 (tie)

F

C

n/i

C-

n/i

2 (tie)

F

C

n/i

C-

n/i

Notes: Rankings proceed from top to bottom with companies at the top as more responsible within the industry and those at the bottom as the less responsible. Letter grades go in this order: A (best),B,C,D,F(worst) with plus (+) and minus (-). "n/i" means we don't have enough information to give a letter grade for that category. The color coding is another corporate responsibility indicator, in the order Green (best), Yellow, Orange, Red (worst). Companies in the green zone are sustainable and working towards creating a greener planet (most industries will not have companioes in the green zone as there are no companies that can be considered sustainable in that industry). Companies red zone have poor environmental and social responsibility records and should be avoided if possible. 'Orange' companies are not quite as bad as 'red' and ' yellow' zone are slightly better than orange. Orange and yellow companies have a ways to go before they can be considered green.

Fast facts about the utilities industry

    • The coal fired power plants that the utilities industry build are the largest single source of mercury pollution and the environmental impact of these plants is devastating. One plant released 5.7 million metric tons of carbon dioxide into the air in a single year and was responsible for approximately 5 percent of the region's total carbon dioxide emissions.
    • The industry has been accused of disseminating misleading information about energy from coal, and lobbying Congress to oppose provisions of the Clean Air Act, particularly limits on mercury emissions.
    • In order to secure unfettered control of land for coal extraction, company representatives orchestrated the signing of land leases by nonexistent Native American tribal councils and arranged for the government-financed relocation of Navajo Nation members who lived atop coal deposits.
    • Visit Go Green to find out how to pressure the industry to expand its use of sustainable energy and look for alternative utility solutions.